Bibliography: One Quarter, Two Blocks, Three Families

Websites

Federal Documents

  • 1900 United States Census. New Orleans, Orleans Parish. Digital image. ancestry.com
  • 1910 United States Census. New Orleans, Orleans Parish. Digital image. ancestry.com
  • 1920 United States Census. New Orleans, Orleans Parish. Digital image. ancestry.com
  • 1930 United States Census. New Orleans, Orleans Parish. Digital image. ancestry.com
  • “Louisiana, Birth Index.” ancestry.com
  • “Louisiana, Death Records.” ancestry.com 
  • “Louisiana, Marriage Licenses.” ancestry.com
  • “Louisiana, Naturalization Records.” Digital Records. ancestry.com
  • “Louisiana, Social Security Death Index.” ancestry.com
  • “Louisiana, Ship Logs.” Digital Records. ancestry.com
  • “U.S., World War I Draft Registration Cards, 1917 – 1918.” Digital Image. ancestry.com
  • “U.S, World War II Draft Registration Cards, 1940 – 1943.” Digital Image. ancestry.com

Newspapers

Images

  • “500 Block of St. Philip Viewed from Decatur.” Photograph. 1970.  The Historic New Orleans Collection. http://hnoc.minisisinc.com
  • Franck, Charles L. “Lamana-Panno-Fallo.” Photograph. 1952.  The Historic New Orleans Collection. http://hnoc.minisisinc.com
  • “French Market, St. Mary.” Photograph. 1895.  The Historic New Orleans Collection. http://hnoc.minisisinc.com
  • Miller, Jack. “Johnny’s Grocery and Bar.” Photography. 1925.  The Historic New Orleans Collection. http://hnoc.minisisinc.com
  • Morgan, Elemore Madison. “Father Vincent and Some of his Boy.” Photograph. 1940.  The Historic New Orleans Collection. http://hnoc.minisisinc.com
  • New Orleans Item (New Orleans, Louisiana), October 22, 1937: 4. NewsBank: America’s News – Historical and Current. https://infoweb.newsbank.com
  • New Orleans Item (New Orleans, Louisiana), October 22, 1938: 2. NewsBank: America’s News – Historical and Current. https://infoweb.newsbank.com
  • Swason, Betsy. “Dante’s Masonic Large Tomb.” Photograph. 1968.  The Historic New Orleans Collection. http://hnoc.minisisinc.com
  • Swason, Betsy. “St. Louis Cemetery II. Dante Masonic Lodge.” Photography. 1986.  The Historic New Orleans Collection. http://hnoc.minisisinc.com
  • Teunisson, John. “St. Mary’s Church.”Photograph. The Historical New Orleans Collection. http://hnoc.minisisinc.com  
  • Times-Picayune (New Orleans, Louisiana), January 7, 1923: 4. NewsBank: Access World News – Historical and Current. https://infoweb.newsbank.com
  • Times-Picayune (New Orleans, Louisiana), May 18, 1940: 12. NewsBank: Access World News – Historical and Current. https://infoweb.newsbank.com
  • Times-Picayune (New Orleans, Louisiana), August 27, 1959: 70. NewsBank: Access World News – Historical and Current. https://infoweb.newsbank.com
  • Times-Picayune (New Orleans, Louisiana), July 18, 1965: 79. NewsBank: Access World News – Historical and Current. https://infoweb.newsbank.com
  • Times-Picayune (New Orleans, Louisiana), December 17, 1995: 80. NewsBank: America’s News – Historical and Current. https://infoweb.newsbank.com
  • Witeman, A. “St. Philip School.” Prints. 1892.  The Historic New Orleans Collection. http://hnoc.minisisinc.com

Secondary Sources

  • Campanella, Richard. Geographies of New Orleans: Urban Fabrics Before the Storm. Lafayette: Center for Louisiana Studies, 2006.
  • Nystrom, Justin. Creole Italian: Sicilian Immigrants and the Shaping of New Orleans Food Culture. Athens: University of Georgia Press, 2018.

City Learns of Dramatic Rescue at Sea

On this day 100 years ago, Captain I. Halvarsen pulled into the port of New Orleans and related the tale of how he managed to tow a schooner for 24 hours and rescue all of its crew members shortly before it foundered and sank, all without the benefit of any communication equipment.

A rough fragment of lustrous silvery metal also known as Manganese Ore.

American schooner Diria, approximately 1364 gross tons, foundered seven miles off the coast of Guantanamo, Cuba. The schooner, only two years old and worth $300,000, was bound for Baltimore from the Cuban ports to transport the Manganese ore. A schooner usually has at least two masts; however, this particular schooner contains five masts and was built in July, 1917 by Columbia River Shipbuilding Corp., Portland, Oregon. This organization was organized in 1918 and led by A. F. Smith and J. Frank Watson to build cargo ships for the U.S. shipping board. This organization built 32 ships in total before the war — which resulted in the end of this organization.

A schooner has at least 2 masts. Her first mast is fore and aft rigged and all subsequent masts are aft rigged. Read more at wrecksite

The schooner was fully functional for two years before it was foundered at the coast of Guantanamo, Cuba. The schooner shipped lumber on the West Coast for San Salvador, ore for Philadelphia and army supplies from New York to London and France. The Diria Schooner’s distress signal was noticed by Captain I. Halvarsen, skipper of the Lake Champlain on October 15th at 5:45 am. He managed to keep the schooner afloat for twenty-four hours and boarded the crew members of the schooner onto his steampship. He also managed to tow the schooner behind the steamship for a day until it began to put Lake Champlain in danger. Eventually, the schooner was cut loose and was foundered a few minutes later. The steamship, Lake Champlain, was bound from Cuba to New Orleans with cargo of sugar. The news of the foundering and rescue was received in New Orleans, as they arrived, due to the lack of radio equipment in 1919.

Sources

“Steamship Brings News Of Disaster Sinking of Schooner Diria Described by Lake Champlain’s Captain.” Times-Picayune. November 11, 1919. Access World News – Historical and Current.

“WRECKSITE – DIRIA SCHOONER 1917-1919.” Accessed October 9, 2019. https://www.wrecksite.eu/wreck.aspx?211867.

Williams, Greg H. The United States Merchant Marine in World War I: Ships, Crews, Shipbuilders and Operators. McFarland & Company, Inc., Publishers, 2017.